Fire Drill-Basic Right? Should be…

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For my Preppers. The average house is engulfed within 166 seconds = 2:46 min, as you see above my women and both kids didn’t open the door until 1:47 out of their room. Lets put the drama that comes from a High School Freshman and a first year Middle Schooler and my women that just finished her Monday. A prep and a plan doesn’t matter when it just needs to be done.

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I got my phone ready and set the stopwatch and turned it on as soon as the fire alarm went off. My plan was to stop them from just walking out the front door. And Jen should help the kids out the window. (we are on a first floor) They opened the door and said “Really Dad” Wow!!!!!! it amazes me no matter what I try to do in life I am always the insane black sheep. I looked at the phone and saw they only had a min left to get outside the house and get to the destination place and THEY WENT BACK TO BED. My own family.

So I understand the struggle that most of you run through as a prepper. Lets review the following points, What did I do wrong? I mean if I wanted to is have us all walk or hike to our bug out location at a moments notice.

Can we schedule a house Fire, Can we set our alarms for a fire to wake us up when one happens? No we can’t

I encourage you to plan you family’s escape plan. It should be fun and playful even if it is at 12:30 at night. You should build confidence in your family and a sense of accomplishment. Today I cannot say the same.

12:30 was just 26 min ago and as a Prepper I’m upset, but it is the world we live in and the struggles we have. Maybe I should of said that Kim Kardashian is in the front of the house and we need to get to her possible we could of survived. Sad times folks.

I encourage my prepper friends to try this a full out drill and time it.

Louisiana flood and what you should do to prepare for the same event

Livingston Parish, Louisiana, The catastrophic flood devastating Louisiana is now the worst natural disaster to strike the United States since Hurricane Sandy four years ago, the Red Cross commented.

6,900,000,000,000 gallons of rain in one week

A total cost at the moment running up to 30 million dollars. Thousands upon thousands have lost everything they own. This disaster is the worst to hit the United States since Super storm Sandy. The damage and the amount is growing daily.

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31 inches of rain fell in 15 hours

The worst thing a prepper can hear is this quote below. We cringe when a natural disaster strikes and we see interviews like this.

“I bought enough food to last for a week in case we were flooded in, but I wasn’t prepared for this much devastation,” said Jo Lee Misner, who lives in the Livingston Parish community of Colyell. “Local stores are running low on everything from food to fuel.”

Its easy to set back and appear that I’m lecturing and on my high horse as they say and I’m not. I wish anyone who reads my post start preparing just a little at a time based on your budget. Allot if your budget allows it.

Educate Yourself

After getting flood insurance, there are several things you can do to minimize losses in your home and ensure your family’s safety.

1. Safeguard your possessions

Create a personal flood file containing information about all your possessions and keep it in a secure place, such as a safe deposit box or waterproof container. This file should have:

  • A copy of your insurance policies with your agents contact information.
  • A household inventory: For insurance purposes, be sure to keep a written and visual (i.e., videotaped or photographed) record of all major household items and valuables, even those stored in basements, attics or garages. Create files that include serial numbers and store receipts for major appliances and electronics. Have jewelry and artwork appraised. These documents are critically important when filing insurance claims. For more information visit www.knowyourstuff.org.
  • Copies of all other critical documents, including finance records or receipts of major purchases.

2. Prepare your house

  • First make sure your sump pump is working and then install a battery-operated backup, in case of a power failure. Installing a water alarm will also let you know if water is accumulating in your basement.
  • Clear debris from gutters and downspouts.
  • Anchor any fuel tanks.
  • Raise your electrical components (switches, sockets, circuit breakers, and wiring) at least 12 inches above your home’s projected flood elevation.
  • Place the furnace, water heater, washer, and dryer on cement blocks at least 12 inches above the projected flood elevation.
  • Move furniture, valuables, and important documents to a safe place.

3. Develop a family emergency plan- Most Important!

  • Create a safety kit with drinking water, canned food, first aid, blankets, a radio, and a flashlight.
  • Post emergency telephone numbers by the phone and teach your children how to dial 911.
  • Plan and practice a flood evacuation route with your family. Know safe routes from home, work, and school that are on higher ground.
  • Ask an out-of-state relative or friend to be your emergency family contact.
  • Have a plan to protect your pets.

Within this plan should be your bug out location and plan and if it is in the same area as a natural disaster you need a plan C.

Please visit this post for EDC

And this for your Bug Out Bag

For more information on emergency preparation, talk to your insurance agent or visit Ready.gov.

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